• The Wire

All wire posts

    • Nam Nguyen

      By Nam Nguyen
      Malware mercenaries <=> programmer would make malware for his or her own use, or perhaps to sell. Today, there are teams and companies dedicated solely to writing malware to bypass specific security defenses, attack specific customers, and accomplish specific objectives.
      • Nam Nguyen

        By Nam Nguyen
        Intellectual property theft and corporate espionage <=> IT security pros have to contend with the large group of malicious hackers that steal intellectual property from companies or perform straight-up corporate espionage. Their method is to break into a company's IT assets, dump all the passwords, and over time, steal gigabytes of confidential information: patents, new product ideas, military secrets, financial information, business plans and so on.
        • Nam Nguyen

          By Nam Nguyen
          Small-time cons <=> money mules and launderers are simply entrepreneurial in nature, small businesses like mom-and-pop operations may steal identities and passwords, or they may cause nefarious redirection to get it. In the end, they want money. They initiate fraudulent credit card or banking transactions and convert their ill-gotten gains into local currency using money mules, electronic cash distribution, e-banking, or some other sort of money laundering.
          • Nam Nguyen

            By Nam Nguyen
            Cyber crime <=> organized crime groups that used to run drugs, gambling, prosecution, and extortion have thrown their hats into the online money grab ring, but competition is fierce, led not by mafiosos but several very large groups of professional criminals aimed specifically at cyber crime.
            • Nam Nguyen

              By Nam Nguyen
              Disable Bluetooth Connectivity <=> Just like your phone’s automatic Wi-Fi connectivity, Bluetooth connectivity can present problems. Bluetooth signals can come from anywhere. If your Bluetooth is left on, nearby assailants can connect to your phone and potentially hack into your device. Keep Bluetooth disabled as much as possible while traveling abroad. In addition to implementing these eight cyber security tips for travelers, you should also check out the laws and regulations governing cyber security in each country you plan to visit. By remaining vigilant during your business travels, you can greatly reduce your risk of suffering a cyber threat.
              • Nam Nguyen

                By Nam Nguyen
                Update Passwords <=> If you plan on traveling, change all of the passwords you regularly use. Similarly, if you must create a PIN for a safe or security box in a hotel room, make sure it’s unique and not something you commonly use. Don’t skimp on password creation either—a numerical sequence is not ideal. Take the time to create something that will keep a criminal out of your personal property. Once you return home, you can change all the passwords back.
                • Nam Nguyen

                  By Nam Nguyen
                  Require employees to use strong passwords and to change them often <=> Consider implementing multifactor authentication that requires additional information beyond a password to gain entry. Check with your vendors that handle sensitive data, especially financial institutions, to see if they offer multifactor authentication for your account.
                  • Nam Nguyen

                    By Nam Nguyen
                    Disable Auto-Connect <=> Most phones in the US have a setting that allows a device to automatically connect to Wi-Fi networks as you pass through them on your day-to-day activities. While this is a nice feature when used at home, it’s not something you should allow while traveling abroad. Before you travel, change this setting so that your smartphone and laptop must be manually connected each time you wish to access the Web.
                    • Nam Nguyen

                      By Nam Nguyen
                      Educate employees about cyberthreats and hold them accountable <=> Educate your employees about online threats and how to protect your business’s data, including safe use of social networking sites. Depending on the nature of your business, employees might be introducing competitors to sensitive details about your firm’s internal business. Employees should be informed about how to post online in a way that does not reveal any trade secrets to the public or competing businesses. Hold employees accountable to the business’s Internet security policies and procedures.
                      • Nam Nguyen

                        By Nam Nguyen
                        Minimize Location Sharing <=> It’s very common for travelers to update social networking sites as they move about new counties or cities. The problem with this type of excessive sharing is that it creates a security threat at home. By signaling your every location, you make it easy for a criminal to determine that you’re not in your hotel room or at your home, leaving your personal belongings within these areas vulnerable to a physical intrusion. Limit the information you post online about your specific whereabouts to limit these threats to your personal property.
                        • Nam Nguyen

                          By Nam Nguyen
                          Install Anti-Virus Protection <=> This is one of the easiest and most effective ways you can keep your personal information, as well as company information, secure while traveling. In addition to using a trusted brand of security, make sure that you regularly update this software as new versions become available.
                          • Nam Nguyen

                            By Nam Nguyen
                            Secure your networks <=> Safeguard your Internet connection by using a firewall and encrypting information. If you have a Wi-Fi network, make sure it is secure and hidden. To hide your Wi-Fi network, set up your wireless access point or router so it does not broadcast the network name, known as the Service Set Identifier (SSID). Password protect access to the router.
                            • Nam Nguyen

                              By Nam Nguyen
                              Establish security practices and policies to protect sensitive information <=> Establish policies on how employees should handle and protect personally identifiable information and other sensitive data. Clearly outline the consequences of violating your business’s cybersecurity policies.
                              • Nam Nguyen

                                By Nam Nguyen
                                Update Operating Systems <=> Just like your anti-virus software, you should keep your operating system as current as possible. This also goes for apps on your phone; take special care to update apps that you regularly use to conduct financial or personal business.
                                • Nam Nguyen

                                  By Nam Nguyen
                                  Protect against viruses, spyware, and other malicious code <=> Make sure each of your business’s computers are equipped with antivirus software and antispyware and update regularly. Such software is readily available online from a variety of vendors. All software vendors regularly provide patches and updates to their products to correct security problems and improve functionality. Configure all software to install updates automatically.