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    • Nam Nguyen

      By Nam Nguyen
      25 great ebook titles in 104 different languages (Afrikaans, Albanian, Amharic, Arabic, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Basque, Belarusian, Bengali, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Catalan, Cebuano, Chichewa, Chinese-Simplified, Corsican, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Filipino, Finnish, French, Galician, Georgian, German, Greek, Gujarati, Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Igbo, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Kannada, Kazakh, Khmer, Korean, Kurdish, Kyrgyz, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Mandarin Chinese, Maori, Marathi, Mongolian, Myanmar, Nepali, Norwegian, Nyanja, Pashto, Persian, Polish, Portuguese, Punjabi, Romanian, Russian, Scots Gaelic, Serbian, Shona, Sindhi, Sinhala, Slovak, Slovenian, Somali, Southern Sotho, Spanish, Sundanese, Swahili, Swedish, Tajik, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vietnamese, Welsh, Western Frisian, Xhosa, Yiddish, Yoruba, Zulu.) Just check out at https://play.google.com/store/books/author?id=Nam+H+Nguyen https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_ebooks_1?ie=UTF8&text=Nam+Nguyen&search-alias=digital-text&field-author=Nam+Nguyen&sort=relevancerank https://www.kobo.com/us/en/search?query=Nam%20Nguyen&fcsearchfield=Author
      • Nam Nguyen

        By Nam Nguyen
        Looking for mutilingual education eBooks like English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin Chinese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Vietnamese. Please support for further development in mutilingual education ebook in the future. See link at https://play.google.com/store/books/author?id=Nam+H+Nguyen
        • Nam Nguyen

          By Nam Nguyen
          SharePoint Consulting Services <=> We will make SharePoint work for you and your organization and are offering a broad range of SharePoint Consulting Services that help you save time, increase productivity, achieve comprehensive security and compliance, reduce complexity, and improve the overall user experience. Our team of SharePoint developers and administrators have extensive expertise leveraging technology to solve real-world business challenges for SharePoint 2010, 2013, 2016 and Office 365 SharePoint, Workflow, Flow, and Nintex Workflow. Please free to check out our multiple SharePoint Live Demo Sites first with user id and password below 1) BART Silicon Valley Project <=> https://lyfespace.sharepoint.com/sites/SVBX/Home3/ 2) Educational eBooks <=> https://lyfespace.sharepoint.com/sites/ee/ 3) Live News <=> https://lyfespace.sharepoint.com/sites/news/ 4) Blogs <=> https://lyfespace.sharepoint.com/sites/Blogs/ 5) SharePoint Consulting Services <=> https://lyfespace.sharepoint.com/sites/scs/ 6) Documents Center <=> https://lyfespace.sharepoint.com/ 7) SharePoint Third Party APPS <=> https://lyfespace.sharepoint.com/sites/stpa/ Sign in: <=> demo@langumania.com and Enter password: <=>Thursday!
          • Nam Nguyen

            By Nam Nguyen
            Air-Sickness<=> This condition is very similar to sea-sickness. (See MOTION (TRAVEL) SICKNESS.)
            • Nam Nguyen

              By Nam Nguyen
              Air Passages<=> The windpipe leads into the chest and divides above the heart into two bronchi, one of which goes to each lung, in which it splits into ?ner and ?ner tubes (see LUNGS). The larynx is enclosed in two strong cartilages: the thyroid (of which the most projecting part, the Adam’s apple, is a prominent point on the front of the neck), and the cricoid (which can be felt as a hard ring about an inch below the thyroid). Beneath this, the trachea – which is sti?ened by rings of cartilage so that it is never closed, no matter what position the body is in – can be traced down until it disappears behind the breastbone.
              • Nam Nguyen

                By Nam Nguyen
                Air Passages<=> These are the nose, pharynx or throat (the large cavity behind the nose and mouth), larynx, trachea or windpipe, and bronchi or bronchial tubes. On entering the nose, the air passes through a high narrow passage on each side, the outer wall of which has three projections (the nasal conchae). It then passes down into the pharynx where the food and air passages meet and cross. The larynx lies in front of the lower part of the pharynx and is the organ where the voice is produced (see VOICE AND SPEECH) by aid of the vocal cords. The opening between the cords is called the glottis, and shortly after passing this the air reaches the trachea or windpipe.
                • Nam Nguyen

                  By Nam Nguyen
                  Air Embolism<=> A bubble of air in a blood vessel that a?ects the ?ow of blood from the heart. Air may enter the circulation after injury, infusions into the venous circulation, or surgery. The victim su?ers breathlessness, chest discomfort, and acute heart failure.
                  • Nam Nguyen

                    By Nam Nguyen
                    Air <=> The general constituents of air are: per cent "Oxygen 20·94" "Nitrogen 78·09" "Argon 0·94" "Carbon dioxide 0·03" Besides these, there are always ozone, minerals and organic matter present in small and variable amounts, and more or less water vapour according to the weather. In the air of towns, sulphurous acid and sulphuretted hydrogen are important impurities derived from combustion. After air has been respired once, the oxygen falls by about 4 per cent and the carbonic acid rises to about 4 per cent, while organic matter and water vapour are greatly increased and the air rises in temperature. The cause of the discomfort felt in badly ventilated rooms and crowded halls is associated with the increase in the temperature and moisture of the air, but a high percentage of carbon dioxide may be present without causing any noticeable discomfort or appreciable quickening of the respiration. A combination of hot weather and emissions from vehicles and fossil-fuel combustion produces pollutants linked to a rise in the incidence of ASTHMA and other cardiorespiratory conditions. Falling levels of ozone in the upper atmosphere are also believed to contribute to global warming because ozone screens the earth from most of the sun’s harmful ultraviolet radiation.
                    • Nam Nguyen

                      By Nam Nguyen
                      AIDS/HIV<=> In the event of an injury, health-care workers are advised to report the incident immediately where, depending on a risk assessment, they may be o?ered post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). They should also wash the contaminated area with soap and water (but without scrubbing) and, if appropriate, encourage bleeding at the site of injury. PEP, using a combination of antiretroviral drugs (in a similar regimen to HAART – see above), is thought to greatly reduce the chances of seroconversion; it should be commenced as soon as possible, preferably within one or two hours of the injury. Although PEP is available, safe systems of work are considered to o?er the greatest protection. Double-gloving (latex gloves remove much of the blood from the surface of the needle during a needlestick), correct use of sharps containers (for used needles and instruments), avoiding the resheathing of used needles, reduction in the number of blood samples taken from a patient, safer-needle devices (such as needles that self-blunt after use) and needleless drug administration are all thought to reduce the risk of exposure to HIV and other blood-borne viruses. Although there have been numerous cases of health-care workers developing HIV through occupational exposure, there is little evidence of health-care workers passing HIV to their patients through normal medical procedures.
                      • Nam Nguyen

                        By Nam Nguyen
                        AIDS/HIV<=> Counselling Confidential counselling is an essential part of AIDS management, both in terms of supporting the psychological wellbeing of the individual and in dealing with issues such as family relations, sexual partners and implications for employment (e.g. for health-care workers). Counsellors must be particularly sensitive to culture and lifestyle issues. Counselling is essential both before an HIV test is taken and when the results are revealed. Health-care workers Health-care workers may be at risk of occupational exposure to HIV, either through undertaking invasive procedures or through accidental exposure to infected blood from a contaminated needle (needlestick injury). Needlestick injuries are frequent in health care – as many as 600,000 to 800,000 are thought to occur annually in the United States. Transmission is much more likely where the worker has been exposed to HIV through a needlestick injury or deep cut with a contaminated instrument than through exposure of mucous membranes to contaminated blood or body ?uids. However, even where exposure occurs through a needlestick injury, the risk of seroconversion is much lower than with a similar exposure to hepatitis C or hepatitis B. A percutaneous exposure to HIV-infected blood in a health-care setting is thought to carry a risk of about one infection per 300 injuries (one in 1,000 for mucous-membrane exposure), compared with one in 30 for hepatitis C, and one in three for hepatitis B (when the source patient is e-antigen positive).
                        • Nam Nguyen

                          By Nam Nguyen
                          AIDS/HIV<=> It should be noted that the drug regimens have been devised for infection with HIV-1; it is not known how e?ective they are at treating infection with HIV-2. HIV and pregnancy An HIV-positive woman can transmit the virus to her fetus, with the risk of infection being particularly high during parturition; however, the risk of perinatal HIV transmission can be reduced by antiviral drug therapy. In the UK, HIV testing is available to all women as part of antenatal care. The bene?ts of antenatal HIV testing in countries where antiviral drugs are not available are questionable. An HIV-positive woman might be advised not to breast feed because of the risks of transmitting HIV via breastmilk, but there may be a greater risk associated with not breast feeding at all. Babies in many poor communities are thought to be at high risk of infectious diseases and malnutrition if they are not breast fed and may thus be at greater overall risk of death during infancy.
                          • Nam Nguyen

                            By Nam Nguyen
                            AIDS/HIV<=> Four classes of drugs are currently in use. Nucleoside analogues, including ZIDOVUDINE and DIDANOSINE, interfere with the activity of the unique enzyme of the retrovirus reverse transcriptase which is essential for replication. Nucleotide analogues, such as tenofovir, act in the same way but require no intracellular activation. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as nevirapine and EFAVIRENZ, act by a di?erent mechanism on the same enzyme. The most potent single agents against HIV are the protease inhibitors, such as lopinavir, which render a unique viral enzyme ineffective. These drugs are used in a variety of combinations in an attempt to reduce the plasma HIV viral load to below detectable limits, which is achieved in approximately 90 per cent of patients who have not previously received therapy. This usually also produces a profound rise in CD4 count. It is likely, however, that such treatments need to be lifelong – and since they are associated with toxicities, long-term adherence is di?cult. Thus the optimum time for treatment intervention remains controversial, with some clinicians believing that this should be governed by the viral load rising above 10,000 copies, and others that it should primarily be designed to prevent the development of opportunistic infections – thus, that initiation of therapy should be guided more by the CD4 count.
                            • Nam Nguyen

                              By Nam Nguyen
                              AIDS/HIV<=> Cultural problems in gaining acceptance for universal condom-use by men in some developing countries suggests that other preventive strategies should also be considered. Microbicides used as vaginal sprays or ‘chemical condoms’ have the potential to give women more direct control over their exposure risk, and research is underway to develop suitable products. Epidemiological studies suggest that male circumcision may o?er some protection against HIV infection, although more research is needed before this can be an established public-health strategy. Globally, about 70 per cent of infected men have acquired the virus through unprotected vaginal sex; in these men, infection is likely to have occurred through the penis with the mucosal epithelia of the inner surface of the foreskin and the frenulum considered the most likely sites for infection. It is suggested that in circumcised men, the glans may become keratinised and thus less likely to facilitate infection. Circumcision may also reduce the risk of lesions caused by other sexually transmitted disease. Treatment AIDS/HIV treatment can be categorised as speci?c therapies for the individual opportunistic infections – which ultimately cause death – and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) designed to reduce viral load and replication. HAART is also the most e?ective way of preventing opportunistic infections, and has had a signi?cant impact in delaying the onset of AIDS in HIV-positive individuals in developed countries.
                              • Nam Nguyen

                                By Nam Nguyen
                                AIDS/HIV<=> In the absence of an e?ective vaccine, preventing exposure remains the chief strategy in reducing the spread of HIV. Used properly, condoms are an extremely e?ective method of preventing exposure to HIV during sexual intercourse and remain the most important public-health approach to countering the further acceleration of the AIDS epidemic. The spermicide nonoxynol-9, which is often included with condoms, is known to kill HIV in vitro; however, its e?ectiveness in preventing HIV infection during intercourse is not known. Public-health strategies must be focused on avoiding high-risk behaviour and, particularly in developing countries, empowering women to have more control over their lives, both economically and socially. In many of the poorer regions of the world, women are economically dependent on men and refusing sex, or insisting on condom use, even when they know their partners are HIV positive, is not a straightforward option. Poverty also forces many women into the sex industry where they are at greater risk of infection.
                                • Nam Nguyen

                                  By Nam Nguyen
                                  AIDS/HIV<=> by the large number of new HIV strains generated through frequent mutation and recombination. because HIV can be transmitted as free virus and in infected cells. because HIV infects helper T-cells – the very cells involved in the immune response. There are, however, numerous research pro grammes underway to develop vaccines that are either prophylactic or therapeutic. Vaccine-development strategies have included: recombinant-vector vaccines, in which a live bacterium or virus is genetically modi?ed to carry one or more of the HIV genes; subunit vaccines, consisting of small regions of the HIV genome designed to induce an immune response without infection; modi?ed live HIV, which has had its disease-promoting genes removed; and DNA vaccines – small loops of DNA (plasmids) containing viral genes – that make the host cells produce non-infectious viral proteins which, in turn, trigger an immune response and prime the immune system against future infection with real virus.